Our Georgia History
 

Georgia's Forts

Colonial and coastal forts
Fort County Nearest city
Delegal's Fort (1736) Glynn St. Simons
Notes: Built by South Carolina militia. Oglethorpe built Ft. St. Simons on this site. Now Couper's Point, the St. Simons lighthouse
Fort Argyle (1733-1747) Bryan Ft. Stewart (Richmond Hill)
Notes: Named for Oglethorpe benefactor Lord Argyle. Many spellings. May have been two forts on this site.

Fort Jones (1735-?)
Fort Wormsloe (1735-?)

Chatham Wormsloe Plantation
Notes: Noble Jones, an original Georgia settler, constructed both of these forts on Skidaway River as protection against the Spanish (or so it was claimed)
Fort Augusta (1736) Richmond Augusta
Note:Reynolds and 6th (St. Paul's Church). Frequently given as 1735 because that's the date William Stephens gave. This is wrong. Named for Augusta, wife of Frederica Prince of Wales. Used until 1767. Oglethorpe met a group of Cherokee and Creek here in 1739, and the Treaty of 1763 was negotiated here.
Fort Brown (1861) Glynn St. Simons
Note:Confederate coastal defenses built near the lighthouse on St. Simons.
Fort Bartow (1861) Chatam Savannah
Note:Largest of the earthwork forts in the Confederacy. Named for Francis Bartow, Georgia hero who took Fort Pulaski (Jan, 1861); died at First Manasas
Fort Cornwallis (1779-1781) Richmond Augusta
Note:English name for Fort Augusta during enemy occupation, this was one of two forts (the other was Fort Grierson) that anchored the defense of the small town of Augusta during the Loyalist occupation in 1780-1781
Fort Barrington
Note:On the Altamaha at the intersection of King's Road, visited by John and William Bartram in 1765.
Fort Darien McIntosh Darien
Note: Built on the site of Fort Prince George. Earthen fort
Fort Fredrica Glynn St. Simons
Fort George (1761) Chatham Savannah
Note:Cockspur Island. Palisade log blockhouse. Fort was destroyed by 1774 thanks to American Patriots. Exact location unknown, but believed to be on a southeast jut of land.
Fort Greene (1794) Chatham Savannah
Note:Cockspur Island. Destroyed by hurricane, 1804. Exact location unknown
Fort Grierson Richmond Augusta
Note: 11th and Reynolds (4 blocks from Ft. Augusta). Actually the stockaded home of Loyalist James Grierson, who, along with Thomas Brown, was in charge of Augusta during the Loyalist occupation. Grierson was killed by Patriots because his Loyalist patrols killed farmers, assaulted wives and children burned farms.
Fort Howe    
Along the Altamaha River, Fort Howe had been called Fort Barrington. Key fort during the American Revolution. Its capture by Thomas Brown and his Florida Rangers during the American Revolution gave displaced Loyalists a route to British East Florida
Fort Jackson Chatham Savannah
Built in 1808 for defense against a naval approach to Savannah. Replaced an earlier fort known as "Mud Fort" built during the American Revolution. Now commonly called "Old Fort Jackson."
Fort King George (1721-1727, 1728-1734) McIntosh Darien
Note: The fort was almost completely destroyed in 1727 and rebuilt. From 1728 until 1734 it held two men who watched for Spanish activity.
Fort McIntosh Brantley Atkinson
Note:Named in honor of William McIntosh, this fort was built on the Satilla River during the First Florida Expedition (the exact location is unknown)
Fort Morris Liberty Sunbury
Note:Coastal fort built to protect the town of Sunbury during the French and Indian War. During the American Revolution the fort was one last to fall to the British.
Fort Prevost (1779) Chatham Savannah
Note: Built on the Trustee Garden, dating back to 1733, by the English after they captured the city in 1779. Named for Augustine Prevost. Other names applied to forts in this area include Fort Halifax, Fort Savannah, and Fort Wayne (see each entry)
Fort Prince William (1779) Camden Cumberland Island
Note: Southern end of island. North end protected by Fort St. Andrew
Fort Pulaski (1848) Chatham Savannah
Fort Halifax (1754) Chatham Savannah
Note: Name applied to Fort Savannah during the French and Indian War. Other names applied to this area include Fort Prevost and Fort Wayne (see each entry).
Fort St. Andrew (1736) Camden Barrimacke (Cumberland Island)
Note: Built well before the land was ceded by the Creek, this fort was on the northern end of the island. Fort Prince William protected the southern end
Fort St. Simon (1738) Glynn St. Simon
Fort Thunderbolt Chatham Savannah (Thunderbolt)
Note: Earthwork fort on Wilmington River during the Civil War
Fort Wayne Chatham Savannah
Note: Called "Trustee Garden Battery" (The Trustee Garden was a common garden dating back to 1733), it was renamed to Fort Wayne after the city of Savannah was evacuated by the British in the face of the underwhelming numbers of radical troops surrounding the city under the command of "Mad" Anthony Wayne. Other names applied to this area include Fort Halifax, Fort Savannah, and Fort Prevost (see each entry). A portion of the fort (the east palisade) is still visible.
Frontier forts
Fort Adams (1812) Telfair Co.
Named in honor of John Adams; One of a string of forts built along the Ocmulgee River to protect settlers from British inspired Creek Indians
Fort Advance (179?) Baldwin Milledgeville
One of three forts built by Elijah Clarke for the Transoconee Expedition
Fort Alert (1812) Charleton Folkston
Built on Traders Hill near the navigable end of the St. Marys River, southwest of Folkston. Refuge for settlers during wars with the Seminole Indians.
Fort Barnum (18??) Ware?
Note:North end of Okefenokee Swamp
Fort Clark (1812) Telfair Co.
Named in honor of Gov. Clark; One of a string of forts built along the Ocmulgee River to protect settlers from British inspired Creek Indians
Fort Daniel (1812) Gwinnett Fort Daniel
Note:Built by Major Tandy Key at the top of Hog Mountain. Lt. George Gilmer left from here to built Fort Peachtree.
Fort Defense (1794) Wayne Doctortown (north of Jesup)
Note:Often overlooked fort near the Altamaha. Commanded by Capt. James Armstrong, the fort was only briefly used. Built near the home of Dr. Alleck, a Creek Indian who was made a Captain by Governor James Wright
Fort Defiance (1795) Baldwin Milledgeville
One of three forts built by Elijah Clarke for the Transoconee Expedition
Fort Defiance (1812) Liberty Sunbury
Earthen fort built from the remains of Fort Morris for the War of 1812.
Fort Early Crisp Warwick
Built by Gen. David Blackshear, named for Gov. Peter Early, used by Andrew Jackson in war against Seminoles and Creek Indians. Near Worth County on Highway 27.
Fort Fidius Baldwin
Note:Fort built on the site of Federal Town sometime after 1792
Fort Gaines (1816) Clay Fort Gaines
Note: Similar in style to Fort Hawkins. Rebuilt? in 1836, 186? Named by Gen. Edmund Gaines in his own honor. One of several forts erected on the western frontier for the protection of settlers. Near confluence of Town Branch and Chemochechobee Creek.
Fort Gilmer (1838) Ware?
Note: One of three forts to bear the name of the popular governor of Georgia. The others are Fort Peachtree (alternate name) and removal fort in North Georgia.
Fort Greene (1812) Pulaski Co.
Named in honor of Nathanael Greene; One of a string of forts built along the Ocmulgee River to protect settlers from British inspired Creek Indians
Fort Hawkins (1806) Bibb Macon East
Note:Named for Benjamin Hawkins, Creek Indian agent. A replica of one of the blockhouses, built in 1938 by the WPA, stands on the approximate location.
Fort Henderson (183?) Charleton Coleraine
Note:Named for Archibald Henderson, Colonel, Commandant of the Marine Corps from 1820 until his death in 1859. He was breveted a brig on March 4, 1843 but always referred to himself as Colonel.
Fort Hollingsworth Banks Hollingsworth
Note:A portion of Hollingsworth remains, west of the city on Wynn Lake Road.
Fort Hughes (1817) Decatur Bainbridge
Note:Built on the site of an old trading post. Andrew Jackson and his men relieved Hughes and Fort Scott during the Seminole War. Aaron Hughes was a bugler in the 7th Infantry.
Fort Jackson (1812) Twiggs Co.
Named in honor of James Jackson; One of a string of forts built along the Ocmulgee River to protect settlers from British inspired Creek Indians
Fort James (1817) Wayne Madray Springs
Note: Below Beard's Bluff on the Altamaha River.
Fort Jones (1836) Stewart Florence
Note: Settlers hid here after Creek Indians burned Roanoke
Fort Laurens (1812) Pulaski Co.
Named in honor of Gov. Laurens; One of a string of forts built along the Ocmulgee River to protect settlers from British inspired Creek Indians
Fort McCreary (1836) Stewart County Omaha
Note: Relieved by a column of soldiers from this fort, the Georgia Militia won the battle of Sheppard's Plantation
Fort McIntosh (1812) Telfair Co.
Named in honor of Lachlan McIntosh; One of a string of forts built along the Ocmulgee River to protect settlers from British inspired Creek Indians
Fort Miller (183?) Ware?
Note:North end of Okefenokee Swamp (see Fort Barnum)
Fort Mitchell (1812) Pulaski Co.
Named in honor of ?; One of a string of forts built along the Ocmulgee River to protect settlers from British inspired Creek Indians
Fort Mitchell (1813) N/A Columbus
Built by Georgia Militia during the Creek Wars Fort Mitchell also served as a prison for Creek Indians before their removal west. This fort is in Russell County, Alabama (more on Fort Mitchell)
Fort Peachtree (1813) Fulton
Note: On the site of the Atlanta Water Works on the Chattahoochee River.
Fort Perry Marion Buena Vista NE
Fort Pike (1812) Pulaski Co.
Named in honor of Zebulon Montgomery Pike; One of a string of forts built along the Ocmulgee River to protect settlers from British inspired Creek Indians
Fort Recovery (1816; abandoned 1821) Decatur Recovery
Fort Scott (1816; abandoned 1821) Decatur Reynoldsville
Named for General Winfield Scott, the fort was built by men under the command of General Andrew Jackson in preparation for The First Seminole War and the invasion of Spanish Florida
Fort Telfair (1812) Twiggs Co.
Named in honor of Gov. Telfair; One of a string of forts built along the Ocmulgee River to protect settlers from British inspired Creek Indians
Fort Twiggs (1812) Twiggs Co.
Named in honor of Gov. Twiggs; One of a string of forts built along the Ocmulgee River to protect settlers from British inspired Creek Indians
Fort Wilkinson Baldwin Milledgeville
Note:Built in accordance with the Treaty of Coleraine, 1796; Replaced by Fort Hawkins in 1805.
Fort Yargo (1792) Barrow Winder
Fort ? (1792) Barrow Jefferson
Fort ? (1793) Jackson Commerce
Removal forts
For more information, please see Cherokee Removal Forts
Fort Buffington Cherokee Buffington
Fort Campbell Forsyth Unknown
Fort Cedartown Polk Unknown
Fort Chastain Fannin
or Towns
Mineral Bluffs
or Hiawassee
Fort Cumming Walker LaFayette
Fort Dahlonega Lumpkin Dahlonega
Fort Gilmer Murray Carters Quarters
Fort Hetzel Gilmer Ellijay
Fort Hoskins Murray Unknown
Fort Means Bartow Kingston
Fort New Echota Gordon New Echota
Fort Newman Pickens Unknown
Fort Rome Floyd Rome
Fort Scudders Forsyth Matt
Fort Sixes Cherokee Sixes
Civil War forts
Fort McAllister (1861-1865) Bryan Richmond Hill
Still standing. Now a Georgia state park off I-95, Richmond Hill exit.
Fort Hood Fulton Northwest Atlanta
Fort Gaines
Fort Walker Fulton Southeast Atlanta
Modern forts
Fort Oglethorpe (1898) Catoosa Ft. Oglethorpe
Camp Thomas after the Civil War, grew to become Fort Oglethorpe, Home of the 6th Cavalry. Decommissioned in 1947, now a town at the northern end of Chickamauga battlefield
Fort Gordon (1956) Richmond Augusta
Camp Gordon (1941-1956). Currently home to the Signal Corps
Fort Stewart Columbus


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