Our Georgia History
 

Augusta Convention
October 26, 1787 The Georgia General Assembly decides to send the question of ratification to a special convention to be held in Augusta, Georgia.
  City of Augusta, Georgia
  Augusta Convention
December 25, 1787 Special convention to ratify the Constitution is scheduled to begin in Augusta.
  Augusta Convention
December 28, 1787 Delayed by "indian problems," the convention to ratify the Constitution is called to order.
  Augusta Convention
December 31, 1787 Augusta Convention unanimously adopts the proposed Constitution and creates a committee to draft a letter of ratification. The letter is written and adopted on the same day.
  Augusta Convention
January 1, 1788 Before signing the letter of ratification, John King and Henry Osborne propose that the Constitution and the ratification by Congress be added to the document. The Convention agrees and returns the document to the committee.
  Augusta Convention
January 2, 1788 Delegates to the Augusta Convention sign the letter of ratification, making Georgia the fourth state to ratify the Constitution of the United States. It was the first state in the Deep South to do so.
  Augusta Convention
  Georgia, the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the United States Constitution
  City of Augusta, Georgia


Convened by the General Assembly, given full powers of ratification and comprised of three delegates from each of Georgia's eleven counties, the Augusta Convention quickly ratified the Constitution of the United States of America. A major underlying factor in the quick ratification was continuing problems with the Creek Indians on the Georgia frontier. Georgia's fears were overshadowed by the desire to have a stronger federal government to help protect the state from attack.




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