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Bobby Jones
March 17, 1902 Golfer Bobby (Robert Tyre) Jones born, Atlanta, Georgia.
  Bobby Jones
July 4, 1908 East Lake Country Club, Atlanta, opens. It is owned by the Atlanta Athletic Club and managed by Robert P. Jones (father of Bobby Jones)
  Bobby Jones
May 31, 1930 Bobby Jones wins the British Amateur open
  Bobby Jones
  Bobby Jones wins the Grand Slam of golf
July 2, 1930 Following his victory in the British Open, golfer Bobby Jones is the guest of honor at a New Yok ticker type parade.
  Bobby Jones
  Bobby Jones wins the Grand Slam of golf
July 12, 1930 Golfer Bobby Jones wins the U. S. Open
  Bobby Jones
  Bobby Jones wins the Grand Slam of golf
September 27, 1930 Bobby Jones completes the first Grand Slam in golf history by winning the U. S. Amateur Open at the Merion Golf Club in Pennsylvania.
  Bobby Jones
  Bobby Jones wins the Grand Slam of golf
December 16, 1930 Bobby Jones wins the Sullivan trophy for becoming the first golfer to win the "Grand Slam." It was the first time the award, which goes to the top amateur athelete in the United States, was presented.
  Bobby Jones
March 22, 1934 Play begins at the first Augusta National Invitational Tournament, later the Masters.
  Bobby Jones
  City of Augusta, Georgia
  Masters Tournament
December 18, 1971 Bobby Jones, 69, dies, Atlanta, Georgia
  Bobby Jones


Perhaps the greatest golfer ever, Robert Tyre ("Bobby") Jones was named for his grandfather, a successful businessman whose general store was the largest north of Atlanta. His father, Colonel Robert P. Jones bought a summer house in Dekalb County and Bobby Jones learned to play golf as a youngster at the East Lake Country Club. He also was interested in baseball.

During his formative years, Jones proved to be an able competitor. When he was nine he won the Atlanta Athletic Association crown, and during a regional amateur competition he was asked (by his opponent's father) to come the 1916 U. S. Amateur Open.

In this, Jones's first major tournament, he was defeated in the quarterfinal round at Merion Cricket Club near Philadelphia. Yet Jones had made an impression on many who attended the match. His second major tournament (1919 U. S. Amateur) was lost during the final round. He competed each year after 1919 until he retired in 1930, winning in 1924-1928 and 1930. Out of 51 individual matches he only lost 8.

At the age of 19 Bobby Jones decided to compete in the British Open. He began the third day at the prestigious St. Andrews course leading all the amateurs who were competing. After a double-bogey on the 10th hole, Jones picked up his ball on the 11th and never completed the course. It was the low point of his career. Over the next two years Jones work not only on his game, but the personal issues that plagued him in his early career.

It was at the 1923 U. S. Open where Bobby turned his game around. During the final round he had tied Bobby Cruickshank going into the 18th hole. The shot from the tee ended in a rough, but on his next shot Jones recovered, driving the ball onto the green, about 8 feet from the hole. With the putt Bobby won his first major tournement.

Over the next 7 years Bobby was winning consistantly, while he was working on his law degree from Emory University. In 1930 he did what no one had done before - he won all major tournements in a single year. The world of golf, the city of Atlanta and the state of Georgia went wild, honoring Bobby with a parade. Unfortunatly, Jones decided to retire rather than become a professional golfer, opting to work in law rather play golf.

He did, however, continue to make contributions to the sport, with books, movies and his own golf clubs. In 1931 the old Fruitland Nursery was purchased by a consortium and Bobby Jones began to design the Augusta National Golf Course along with Alister Mackenzie. Jones played in the first tournement. He would make his final appearence at the Masters in 1948, when diagnosed with syringomyelia, a dibilatating spinal disease.

In his private life Bobby Jones was a successful lawyer. In 1942 he joined the Army Air Corps, landing in Normandy the day after D-Day (his unit had been converted to infantry). Slowly, though, the syringomyelia made walking more difficult, and he died from complications of the disease.







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