Our Georgia History
 

Cherokee County, Georgia
December 21, 1830 The Sixth Georgia Land Lottery, sometimes called the Cherokee Georgia lottery, is authorized by the General Assembly. The major difference between this lottery and the preceding five lotteries is that Georgia did not have a claim to the land it was giving away: The Cherokee had never ceded it.
  Cobb County, Georgia
  Georgia Land Lotteries
  Cherokee County, Georgia
  Lumpkin County, Georgia
  Dawson County, Georgia
  Union County, Georgia
  Whitfield County, Georgia
  Floyd County, Georgia
  Walker County, Georgia
  Cass County, Georgia
December 24, 1831 Georgia Gold Lottery enacted. This lottery, whose enabling act and drawing dates were different than the Sixth Georgia Land Lottery is, for some reason, frequently combined with the earlier lottery. It is, in fact, totally separate
  Cobb County, Georgia
  Georgia Land Lotteries
  Lumpkin County, Georgia
  Cherokee County, Georgia
December 26, 1831 The original Cherokee County created
  Lumpkin County, Georgia
  Gilmer County, Georgia
  Floyd County, Georgia
  Forsyth County, Georgia
  Bartow County, Georgia
  Cass County, Georgia
  Cobb County, Georgia
  Cherokee County, Georgia
  Original Cherokee County
  Forsyth County, Georgia
November 24, 1832 Start of the sixth land lottery. Georgia did not own the land it was giving to settlers
  Cobb County, Georgia
  Georgia Land Lotteries
  Original Cherokee County
  Gilmer County, Georgia
  Cherokee County, Georgia
  Cass County, Georgia
  Floyd County, Georgia
  Walker County, Georgia
  Union County, Georgia
  Forsyth County, Georgia
  Murray County, Georgia
  Lumpkin County, Georgia
December 3, 1832 Cherokee County created
  Creation of Georgia Counties
  Original Cherokee County
  Cherokee County, Georgia
February 9, 1909 Dean Rusk born, Cherokee County, Georgia
  Cherokee County, Georgia
  Dean Rusk
May 9, 1932 Portions of Cherokee, Gwinnett and Cobb Counties, along with all of Campbell County and Milton County are ceded to Fulton County.
  Campbell County, Georgia
  Fulton County, Georgia
  Gwinnett County, Georgia
  Cherokee County, Georgia
  Cobb County, Georgia
May 6, 2003 Strong storms move through north Georgia. Among the counties hardest hit are Floyd, Walker, Catoosa, Gordon, Bartow, Cherokee, Cobb, Fulton, Gwinnett, Dekalb, Clarke, Barrow and Elbert County.
  Gwinnett County, Georgia
  Fulton County, Georgia
  Bartow County, Georgia
  Catoosa County, Georgia
  Catoosa County, Georgia
  Gordon County, Georgia
  Walker County, Georgia
  Floyd County, Georgia
  Cobb County, Georgia
  Cherokee County, Georgia
  Clarke County, Georgia
February 24, 2010 Apple's Itunes online music store, crossed the 10 billion song threshold when 71-year-old Louie Sulcer of Woodstock, Ga., bought "Guess Things Happen That Way" by Johnny Cash. Steven Jobs called Sulcer to congratulate him for winning 10,000 free songs.
  Cherokee County, Georgia


Name derivation:Named in honor of the Cherokee Indians, from whom the state illegally took the land.
Acquisition: Treaty of New Echota (1835)
Taken from: Original County
Counties created from: Milton County, Pickens County
Cities: Canton (county seat), Ball Ground, Holly Springs, Waleska, and Woodstock

Web sites:
National Register of Historic Places in Cherokee County, Georgia
Archives of Cherokee County, Georgia
Cherokee County, Georgia, links

History

Formed in 1832, and ceded by the Cherokee to the state of Georgia under the corrupt Treaty of New Echota, Cherokee County began as a rural, agriculture-based economy. Before the Civil War Canton was its only major city. It was in Canton that future governor Joe Brown practiced law.

In 1880 the Marietta and North Georgia Railroad came to town, providing jobs and non-agriculture based income for a number of people. Storeowner Robert Tyre Jones would benifit from the railroad's prensence -- his general store in Canton would become the largest in north Georgia.

"Canton denim," a product of the Canton Cotton Mills, made the city famous internationally, at least according to the city web site. Completed in 1924, the mill closed in 1981, thanks to foreign competition.





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