Our Georgia History
 

Chisholm v. Georgia
December 14, 1792 Georgia assembly passes a resolution calling Chisholm v. Georgia an attempt to render the states to be "tributary corporations to the Government of the United States."
  Chisholm v. Georgia
February 5, 1793 The U. S. Supreme Court hears the case of Chisholm v. Georgia
  Chisholm v. Georgia
February 18, 1794 The U. S. Supreme Court rules against the state of Georgia in Chisholm v. Georgia
  Chisholm v. Georgia
March 4, 1794 Congress proposes the 11th Amendment to the U. S. Constitution
  Chisholm v. Georgia
November 29, 1794 Georgia is the 11th state to ratify the 11th Amendment to the U. S. Constitution
  Chisholm v. Georgia
February 7, 1795 Ratification of the 11th Amendment is complete.
  Chisholm v. Georgia
January 8, 1798 Ratification of the 11th Amendment is formally announced by the President
  Chisholm v. Georgia


In an early landmark case for the U. S. Supreme Court the state of Georgia refused to reimburse South Carolina merchant Robert Farquhar for goods it had ordered in 1777, during the American Revolution. Alexander Chisholm, representing what was now the estate of Farquhar, sought a writ of inquiry from the court.

Represented before the court by Attorney-General Edmund Randolph, the 5-member court ruled 4-1 against Georgia, who had refused to send a representative. Following the Supreme Court decision, three states proposed an amendment to mitigate the ruling. This became the 11th Amendment to the U. S. Constitution.

The Judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against one of the United States by Citizens of another State, or by Citizens or Subjects of any Foreign State.




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