Our Georgia History
 

Creek Indians
December 14, 1703 Colonel James Moore (Governor of South Carolina) begins a southward sweep for Spanish and Spanish-friendly Indians from the trading post at Ocmulgee Old Fields.
  Creek Indians
December 19, 1703 Attacked as they approach a fortified position, Colonel Moore, 50 irregulars and about 1,000 Creek Indians attack the town of Ayaville, in present-day Worth County on the Flint River
  Creek Indians
  Worth County, Georgia
December 29, 1703 Colonel Moore states he reached Appalachia, and is now returning to Ocmulgee after successfully battling the Spanish and Indians.
  Creek Indians
May 21, 1733 First treaty with the Creek Indians. When Oglethorpe landed, Tomochichi had granted Oglethorpe the right to use the land on the Savannah River, but explained that chiefs of the Creek Nation needed to also approve the transfer of land.
  City of Savannah, Georgia
  Creek Indians
  Oglethorpe signs treaty with Creek
October 18, 1733 Treaty between the Creek and Oglethorpe ratified by the Trustees
  Creek Indians
  James Oglethorpe
June 15, 1738 Oglethorpe reports that the Spanish are attempting to bribe the Creek Nation to attack the Georgia colony
  Creek Indians
  James Oglethorpe
July 17, 1739 Oglethorpe starts a journey to the Creek capitol of Coweta, accompanied by Lieutenant Dunbar, Ensign Leman and Cadet Erye. They left Savannah, headed to Uchee Town, north of Ebenezer, then headed west along the old Creek Trading Path.
  City of Savannah, Georgia
  Creek Indians
  James Oglethorpe
August 21, 1739 Creeks confirm their cession of land to Georgia in a second treaty
  James Oglethorpe
  Treaty of Coweta
  Creek Indians
January 1, 1740 At the head of a fleet that included some 15 boats and 200 men, General Oglethorpe decides to raid two Spanish forts in response to an earlier attack by the Spanish on Amelia Island. The raiding party is a combined force of Highland Rangers, soldiers from Fort Frederica, and Creek, Chickasaw, and Uchee Indians.
  James Oglethorpe
  Creek Indians
July 20, 1747 Mary Musgrove, with her husband Thomas Bosomworth and about 200 Creek Indian warriors, marches into Savannah and proclaims herself the Queen of the Creek. She demands payment for services rendered to the colony of Georgia.
  City of Savannah, Georgia
  Creek Indians
August 10, 1747 Queen of the Creeks, Mary Musgrove, claims ownership of much of Georgia, including the land from Savannah to Pipe Makers Bluff
  City of Savannah, Georgia
  Creek Indians
December 14, 1747 Mico Malatchi made Head of the Creek nation (Muscogee Confederacy). Malatchi then gives Thomas and Mary Bosomworth Ossabaw, St. Catherines and Sapalo islands
  Creek Indians
November 3, 1757 Because of increased tensions due to the French and Indian War, Georgia signs a peace treaty with the Creek Indians.
  Creek Indians
December 26, 1759 Treaty made with Creek at Fort Prince George, near the Cherokee village of Keowee (present day South Carolina). Some 30 warriors are left at the fort to ensure that the Creek abide by the treaty. Smallpox breaks out, killing these Creek and fueling a war when the Creek kill the fort's commander in revenge.
  Creek Indians
November 10, 1763 Creek Indians cede coastal land from the Altamaha to the St. Mary's to Georgia.
  Charlton County, Georgia
  Creek Indians
May 1, 1773 William Bartram heads to Augusta, Georgia, to participate in meetings with the Creek Indians
  William Bartram
  Creek Indians
June 1, 1773 Royal Governor James Wright and British Indian Agent John Stuart conclude a meeting to resolve boundary disputes with the Treaty of Augusta, which ceded some 675,000 acres from the Creek Nation to the state of Georgia.
  James Wright
  Creek Indians
  Taliaferro County, Georgia
  City of Augusta, Georgia
June 11, 1773 Royal governor James Wright issues a proclamation describing land recently ceded by the Creek Indians, encouraging farmers and artisans to settle with their families.
  James Wright
  Creek Indians
January 16, 1774 War breaks out with the Creek over the settlement of recently ceded lands
  Creek Indians
March 31, 1774 Head Turkey, a Creek on the way to Savannah to negotiate a peace treaty is murdered near Augusta by Thomas Fee. Fee would later escape jail, but Royal governor Wright's offer of a $100 reward appeases the Creek
  City of Savannah, Georgia
  James Wright
  Creek Indians
October 20, 1774 Peace treaty signed with the Creek, ending hostilities that commenced in January, 1774
  Creek Indians
July 3, 1775 Heading west to Creek country from Silver Bluff on the Savannah River (near Augusta), William Bartram spends the night at Ocmulgee Old Fields (now Ocmulgee Mounds National Park).
  Creek Indians
  William Bartram
  City of Augusta, Georgia
May 1, 1776 200 Creek Indians meet with representatives of the Georgia government in Augusta.
  Creek Indians
  City of Augusta, Georgia
  Creek Indians at Augusta
June 17, 1777 400 Creek warriors, George Galphin, Robert Rae and the Georgia Indian commission meet at Ogeechee Old Town. From here the chiefs journeyed to Augusta and Charleston.
  Creek Indians
June 23, 1782 General "Mad" Anthony Wayne intercepts a large force of Creek Indians attempting to relieve the British in Savannah. Unknown to General Wayne, he kills Creek Chief Emistesigo (leader of the tribe).
  City of Savannah, Georgia
  Creek Indians
  'Mad' Anthony Wayne
  Georgia and the American Revolution
November 1, 1783 Creek Indians agree to a land cession of lands in northeast Georgia, claimed by both the Creek and Cherokee Indians
  Creek Indians
  Johnson County, Georgia
  Washington County, Georgia
November 12, 1785 Known as the Treaty of Galphinton, this treaty, signed with the Creek Indians shortly before the Treaty of Hopewell, acknowledged the boundaries of earlier treaties.
  Creek Indians
  Charlton County, Georgia
August 27, 1786 Following the uprising of the Creek, Governor Telfair contacts Governor Sevier of Franklin to propose that Georgia and Tennessee march against the Creek at the same time.
  Creek Indians
August 7, 1790 The Treaty of New York is signed by President George Washington, Alexander McGillivray and others.
  George Washington
  Creek Indians
June 28, 1796 A conference between Georgia, the United States and the Creek Confederacy at Coleraine on St. Mary's River ends with the Georgia commissioners denouncing the proceeding as a "...fraud on the state"
  Creek Indians
November 29, 1813 Battle of Autosee (Atasi) in the Creek War
  Creek Indians
August 9, 1814 Treaty of Fort Jackson, ceding the lower third of Georgia is signed by the Creek
  Jeff Davis County, Georgia
  Atkinson County, Georgia
  Berrien County, Georgia
  Early County, Georgia
  Baker County, Georgia
  Creek Indians
January 22, 1818 Treaty with Creek at Creek Agency on the Flint River
  Atkinson County, Georgia
  Creek Indians
February 13, 1818 Andrew Jackson arrives at Fort Early in Crisp County. They will use the fort extensively in the Seminole Indian War and in the War against the Creek Indians
  Crisp County, Georgia
  Creek Indians
April 8, 1818 General Andrew Jackson orders his men to hang Francis the Prophet and Micco Homollimico, Creek Indians who had been captured a few days earlier.
  Creek Indians
January 8, 1821 Treaty with the Creek at Indian Springs, Creek Nation ceded additional Creek land to Georgia
  Butts County, Georgia
  Bibb County, Georgia
  Monroe County, Georgia
  Pike County, Georgia
  Creek Indians
February 12, 1825 William McIntosh, the son of an American Revolution hero and a Creek woman, signs the Treaty of Indian Springs. In exchange for a plantation on the Chattahoochee River, McIntosh signs away almost all remaining Creek land in Georgia
  Creek Indians
April 30, 1825 Creek Chief William McIntosh is executed for trading Creek land to the state of Georgia without consent of the Creek tribal council.
  Creek Indians
January 24, 1826 Treaty with the Creek at Washington, DC. This voided the Treaty of 1825 at Indian Springs
  Creek Indians
March 26, 1826 A supplement to the Creek Treaty of Jan 24 is signed.
  Creek Indians
January 1, 1827 Creek relinquish ceded land in western Georgia.
  Creek Indians
December 7, 1835 In an address to the House of Representatives, Gov. William Schley charges that Creek Indians from Alabama with hostilities against Georgians living in Stewart and Baker Counties.
  William Schley
  Creek Indians
  Stewart County, Georgia
  Baker County, Georgia
June 9, 1836 A battle is fought between Georgia militia and Creek Indian in the vicinity of Fort Jones. It is known as the Battle of Shepherd's Plantation
  Creek Indians






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