Our Georgia History
 

Donald L. Hollowell
December 9, 1917 Civil Rights attorney Donald Hollowell born, Wichita, Kansas
  Donald L. Hollowell
June 23, 1952 Donald Hollowell, Constance Baker Motley and Austin Thomas Walden file suit in Atlanta federal court to allow Horace Ward into the University of Georgia Law School
  Donald L. Hollowell
September 9, 1953 Horace Ward is drafted, effectively suspending his case to integrate the University of Georgia.
  Donald L. Hollowell
December 17, 1956 Horace Ward's suit opens in court, as he continues his attempt to integrate the University of Georgia
  Donald L. Hollowell
February 12, 1957 Federal judge Frank Hooper dismisses Horace Ward's case to integrate the University of Georgia on the grounds that he had failed to reapply when he was rejected and that he had been accepted to another law school
  Donald L. Hollowell
  The Road to Integration
January 18, 1960 City of Atlanta approves plan to desegregate schools
  Donald L. Hollowell
  The Road to Integration
May 9, 1960 Judge Hooper sets a deadline for the desegregation of Atlanta schools at May 1, 1961
  Donald L. Hollowell
  Frank A. Hooper
  The Road to Integration
October 28, 1960 MLK released from Reidsville State Prison
  Donald L. Hollowell
  Martin Luther King
January 6, 1961 Macon judge William Bootle instructs the University of Georgia to admit Charlayne Hunter and Hamilton Holmes to the University, finding that they had been excluded from admission simply because they were black
  Donald L. Hollowell
  University of Georgia, Athens (UGA)
  The Road to Integration
January 9, 1961 Bootle stays his ruling forcing the University of Georgia to desegregate. Bootle's stay is ruled "improvidently granted" by an Atlanta judge. Vernon Jordan is told to escort Charlayne Hunter and Hamilton Holmes to UGA to register for class. Georgia Governor Earnest Vandiver, who is required by law to close integrated schools does so in a way that UGA can keep operating at least for a few days: He cuts off state funding.
  Donald L. Hollowell
  University of Georgia, Athens (UGA)
  Ernest Vandiver, Jr.
  The Road to Integration
January 10, 1961 Judge W. A. Bootle issues a temporary injunction preventing Georgia governor Earnest Vandiver from cutting off funds to the University of Georgia to prevent black Americans from attending class.
  Donald L. Hollowell
  University of Georgia, Athens (UGA)
  Ernest Vandiver, Jr.
January 11, 1961 Charlayne Hunter and Hamilton Holmes attend their first classes at UGA. Following a nighttime basketball game, a rowdy group surrounds Hunter's dorm and is broken up by Athens police. Hunter and Holmes are suspended "for their own protection."
  University of Georgia, Athens (UGA)
  Donald L. Hollowell
  The Road to Integration
January 12, 1961 Judge W. A. Bootle strikes down a state law designed to cut off funding if the University of Georgia becomes integrated.
  Donald L. Hollowell
  University of Georgia, Athens (UGA)
  Ernest Vandiver, Jr.
January 12, 1961 Judge Bootle orders UGA to readmit Charlayne Hunter and Hamilton Holmes and charges Governor Ernest Vandiver with the responsibility of protecting them
  Donald L. Hollowell
  The Road to Integration
  Ernest Vandiver, Jr.
December 27, 2004 Donald Hollowell dies of heart failure, Atlanta, Georgia
  Donald L. Hollowell


According to Former U. N. Ambassador Andrew Young, Donald Hollowell impressed judges so much that within 5 minutes it no longer mattered if he were black or white. When citing a supporting case he would frequently add the page number to make it easier for the law clerk to find. Unlike many of the lawyers of the day (black or white), Hollowell spoke in Elizabethan English, which also impressed judges.

Donald Hollowell is closely associated with two pivotal Georgia Civil Rights cases, the integration of Atlanta Public Schools and the integration of the University of Georgia (UGA), but for more than 40 years this man was a quiet leader in the battle for Civil Rights in Georgia. His legacy includes desegregating buses in Augusta and schools in Macon, and freeing Martin Luther King from Reidsville Prison where he landed following a parole violation stemming from a traffic offense.

When Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta refused to allow African-American doctors to work in the hospital, Hollowell argued and won the Civil Rights case that had national impact.




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