Our Georgia History
 

General George Thomas
July 31, 1813 George Thomas, U. S. Civil War general, born Southhampton, Virgina
  General George Thomas
September 19, 1863 Battle of Chickamauga
September 20, 1863
  Civil War - 1863
  General George Thomas
  Catoosa County, Georgia
  Walker County, Georgia
  Chickamauga-Second Day
  Chickamauga-First Day
  Patrick Ronayne Cleburne
  James Longstreet
May 13, 1864 Battle of Resaca
May 13, 1864
  Civil War - 1864
  William Tecumseh Sherman
  General George Thomas
May 27, 1864 Battle of Picketts Mill
  Civil War - 1864
  Patrick Ronayne Cleburne
  General George Thomas
July 20, 1864 Battle of Peachtree Creek
  Civil War - 1864
  William Tecumseh Sherman
  General George Thomas
March 28, 1870 General George Thomas dies of a stroke while on duty in San Francisco. He was 53.
  General George Thomas


This Virginia-born general, noted as the "Rock of Chickamauga" for his determined stand on Snodgrass Hill, his defensive position in Chattanooga and his destruction of General John Bell Hood's army in Nashville, was once considered by Abraham Lincoln to command the Union forces. Lincoln rejected him because he was from Virginia.

First active duty for Thomas was in the Shenandoah Valley in his home state of Virginia. He was quickly promoted to general and won decisive victories throughout the Western Theater. In January, 1863, he becomes commander of the 14th Corps, Army of the Cumberland, reporting to William Rosecrans. Over the next 9 months his corps advanced with the rest of Rosecrans army, rarely engaging in significant combat, a testament to the uncanny strategic mind of Rosecrans. It was near Chickamauga Creek, on September 20, 1863, however, that Thomas gained his greatest fame. After General John B. Hood exploited a hole in the Union line and forced Rosecrans from the field of battle, Thomas organized a weak line of men along a modest ridge near the Snodgrass cabin. At times giving orders directly to enlisted men, Thomas, backed by the timely arrival of Gordon Granger and his reserves, rallied to halt the Rebel advance. At evening he began a staggered withdrawal to Chattanooga.

During the Atlanta Campaign Thomas repeatedly defeated the Army of Tennessee commanders Joe Johnston and John Bell Hood. His only major mistake came when he ordered a late afternoon attack on what he felt was the end of the Dallas Line, near Pickett's Mill in present-day Paulding County.

Thomas withstood the brunt of Hood's First Sortie (battle of Peachtree Creek). During the March to the Sea Thomas moved to Tennessee to protect against John Bell Hood, which he did successfully at the battles of Franklin and Nashville.





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