Our Georgia History
 

James Gunn
March 13, 1753 James Gunn, U. S. Senator from Georgia is born, Virginia
  James Gunn
May 6, 1786 A group of runaway slaves, reportedly trained by the British, is discovered by Lieutenant Colonel Howell at Bear Creek near Zubley's Ferry. James Gunn had been ordered to break up the group. Gunn ordered 14 cavalrymen to advance on a weak breastworks constructed by the runaways. When the slaves saw the soldiers advancing they ran, Troops advanced, following them into the woods and killing almost all 150 men.
  James Gunn
July 14, 1787 James Gunn, Abraham Baldwin and James Jackson visit William Bartram's home in Philadelphia
  William Bartram
  James Jackson
  Abraham Baldwin
  James Gunn
  James Jackson
March 4, 1789 James Gunn and William Few begin service as Georgia's first U. S. Senators. Abraham Baldwin, James Jackson and George Mathews begin service in the U. S. House of Representatives.
  Abraham Baldwin
  James Gunn
  William Few
  James Jackson
April 3, 1789 George Washington is inaugurated as the first chief executive of the United States. Georgians Abraham Baldwin, James Jackson, and James Gunn are in attendance.
  Abraham Baldwin
  James Gunn
  George Washington
January 7, 1795 Governor George Mathews signs into law a bill that agrees to sell almost 40 million acres to speculators at the starting the Yazoo Land Fraud. This corrupt deal led to the downfall of many popular politicians of the day.
  Yazoo Land Fraud
  Georgia headright grants
  James Gunn
August 22, 1795 During the Yazoo Land Fraud, James Gunn, Mathew M'Allister, George Walker, Zachariah Cox, Jacob Walburger, William Longstreet and Wade Hampton, by deed, convey a portion of the Georgia Company's land to James Greenleaf. Greenleaf's later sale of the land results in the landmark U. S. Supreme Court ruling, Fletcher v. Peck.
  James Gunn
  Yazoo Land Fraud
  Fletcher v. Peck
July 30, 1801 James Gunn dies, Louisville, Georgia
  James Gunn


James Gunn

Virginia-born James Gunn served in the Virginia Line, which refers to the combination of Continental and state militia raised in the state. Gunn's conduct while in the military was questionable and his service was lackluster. After moving to Georgia, he challenged his old commander, Nathanael Greene to a duel for an "insult" Greene had issued during the American Revolution




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