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James Longstreet
January 8, 1821 James Longstreet born, Edgefield District, South Carolina
  James Longstreet
June 17, 1861 James Longstreet joins the Confederate Army at the rank of Brigadier General
  James Longstreet
July 18, 1861 First Manassas (Bull Run)
  James Longstreet
October 7, 1861 James Longstreet promoted to major general
  James Longstreet
October 9, 1862 James Longstreet promoted to lieutenant general
  Civil War - 1862
  James Longstreet
July 1, 1863 Battle of Gettysburg, PA
  Civil War - 1863
  Lafayette McLaws
  James Longstreet
July 7, 1863 General Lafayette McLaws writes a letter critical of his childhood friend and commanding officer at Gettysburg, James Longstreet
  Lafayette McLaws
  James Longstreet
September 19, 1863 Battle of Chickamauga
September 20, 1863
  Civil War - 1863
  General George Thomas
  Catoosa County, Georgia
  Walker County, Georgia
  Chickamauga-Second Day
  Chickamauga-First Day
  Patrick Ronayne Cleburne
  James Longstreet
October 12, 1863 At the request of Braxton Bragg, Jeff Davis approves relieving Daniel Harvey Hill of command. Longstreet is detached and others who disagree with Bragg are reassigned
  Jefferson Davis
  James Longstreet
December 17, 1863 Major General Lafayette McLaws is relieved of duty by General James Longstreet after the battle of Fort Sanders. McLaws demands a court-martial. He is cleared of all charges
  Lafayette McLaws
  James Longstreet
September 14, 1874 New Orleans Riot, suppressed by James Longstreet
  James Longstreet
June 14, 1880 James Longstreet appointed Minister Resident of Turkey
  James Longstreet
December 14, 1880 James Longstreet presents credentials as U. S. Minister to Turkish government
  James Longstreet
April 29, 1881 James Longstreet leaves Turkey
  James Longstreet
April 27, 1896 General Lafayette McLaws [CS, Longstreet] addresses the Confederates Veterans Association of Savannah and changes the story he gave in his official report, taking James Longstreet to task for the failure at Gettysburg
  City of Savannah, Georgia
  Lafayette McLaws
  James Longstreet
January 2, 1904 James Longstreet dies, Gainesville, Georgia
  James Longstreet


James Longstreet

James Longstreet, who was respected Confederate general of the American Civil War, enjoyed a wide-ranging post-war career that included a conversion to the Republican Party, as a diplomat and owner of a successful hotel.

Early life

Born in South Carolina Longstreet was raised in Augusta, Georgia, then Somerville, Alabama following the death of his father. After securing appointment to West Point from Alabama in 1838, he graduated in 1842. During the Mexican War (1846-1848) Longstreet rose to the rank of major, participating in the battles of Palo Alto, Resaca de la Palma, and Monterey among others. He resigned his commission in June, 1861 and immediately joined the Confederate Army with a rank of Brigadier General.

Civil War

General Longstreet withstood a Union assault on Blackburn's Ford during First Manassas. During the Seven Days Battles, Longstreet commanded the left wing of Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. At Second Manassas (Second Bull Run) he and "Stonewall" Jackson crushed the Union Army. At the battle of Sharpsburg (Antietam) Longstreet's men held the line against a numerically superior Union Army.

In December, 1862, his I Corps played a decisive role at Fredericksburg. Longstreet positioned his men atop Marye’s Heights and repulsed successive assaults by the U. S. Army. Rejoining Lee after Chancellorsville, Longstreet took part in Lee's Gettysburg campaign where he clashed with his commanding officer over tactics.

On July 2 Longstreet's delayed action on the Union left might have succeeded if Longstreet had not delayed his advance until reinforcements arrived. On July 3 Lee ordered Longstreet to charge the Union line, a task he assigned to General George Pickett. In a 1000 yard dash that became known as "Pickett's Charge", Confederate forces lost 7,000 men. Only after the death of Robert E. Lee did subordinates blame Longstreet for the defeat at Gettysburg.

Longstreet in Georgia

Lee reassigned Longstreet to General Bragg in Georgia prior to the battle of Chickamauga. As a result of Longstreet's timely arrival the tide of battle was turned, with the Confederates winning their greatest victory of the war.

Longstreet was unhappy with his new commander. Braxton Bragg had made a serious tactical error following the battle of Chickamauga, refusing to chase the staggering Army of the Cumberland to Chattanooga. Confederate President Jefferson Davis visited North Georgia, backing his old friend Braxton Bragg and ignoring complaints from some of the best generals in the Confederacy. As punishment, Bragg sent Longstreet on the disastrous Knoxville Campaign he was defeated. After Grant broke out of Chattanooga, Longstreet reported to Lee.

During the Battle of the Wilderness Longsteet was wounded by friendly fire during an attack on a Union position. He again assumed command of the Richmond, Virginia defensive line and surrendered his men at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865.

Following the War

Longstreet became friends with Ulysses S. Grant, and joining his Republican Party. In various assignments Longstreet served as Ambassador to Turkey (then the Ottoman Empire), postmaster of Gainesville, Georgia, and U.S. Commissioner of Railroads. Privately, he ran a hotel near downtown in Gainesville.

James Longstreet
The Longstreet Chronicles




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