Our Georgia History
 

Okefenokee Swamp
February 27, 1800 Ellicott's Mound erected to denote the boundary between Georgia and Spanish Florida, where the St. Mary's River is formed by the Okefenokee Swamp
  Okefenokee Swamp
April 9, 1818 Andrew Jackson enters the Okefenokee Swamp in search of Billy Bowlegs (Bolek) and his band of Seminole Indians.
  Okefenokee Swamp
April 18, 1818 American troops surround the village of Billy Bowlegs (Bolek) in the Okefenokee Swamp. As they advance they find a single man - Lt. Robert Ambrister of the British Army
  Okefenokee Swamp
May 9, 1832 Treaty of Payne's Landing is signed. The treaty required that the Seminole Indians be removed to the west. A small band of the Seminoles lived in Georgia's Okefenokee Swamp.
  Okefenokee Swamp
May 27, 1838 40 militia skirmish with a band of Seminole, Okefenokee Swamp
  Okefenokee Swamp
October 29, 1889 Georgia legislature approves the sale of the remaining land in the Okefenokee Swamp
  Okefenokee Swamp
January 1, 1891 Sale of 238,120 acres of the Okefenokee Swamp to the Suwannee Canal Company by the State of Georgia for $62,000.
  Okefenokee Swamp
December 28, 1909 Henry "Obediah" Barber dies at his home in the Okefenokee Swamp
  Okefenokee Swamp
  Henry Obediah Barber
November 25, 1933 Jean Sherwood Harper writes to her former employer, arguing for protection of the Okefenokee Swamp as a wildlife sanctuary. She had worked for then President Franklin Roosevelt as a young lady.
  Franklin Delano Roosevelt
  Okefenokee Swamp
March 30, 1937 President Franklin Roosevelt issues an executive order creating the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge.
  Okefenokee Swamp
  Franklin Delano Roosevelt
December 5, 1945 Five Avenger-class torpedo bombers leave Ft. Lauderdale NAS on a training flight over the Atlantic and disappear five hours later. One credible theory to the disappearance of the planes is that they landed in the Okefenokee Swamp.
  Okefenokee Swamp
October 4, 1948 Walt Kelley, a Yankee from Connecticut, published a comic strip based on characters he created earlier in his life. Pogo was set in the Okefenokee Swamp (Fort Mudge) and began to appear when Kelly was art director for the short-lived New York Star.
  Okefenokee Swamp


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