Our Georgia History
 

Robert Toombs
July 2, 1810 Robert Augustus Toombs born, Wilkes County, Georgia
  Wilkes County, Georgia
  Robert Toombs
July 31, 1824 Robert Toombs admitted to the University of Georgia. He is 14 years old
  University of Georgia, Athens (UGA)
  Robert Toombs
September 15, 1825 Junius and Granby Hillyer "thrash" Robert Toombs. Toombs leaves, finds a gun and tries to shoot one of the brothers. He was stopped by a third party, then returned with a knife and later another gun. The Hillyer brothers were unharmed.
  University of Georgia, Athens (UGA)
  Robert Toombs
September 20, 1825 Robert Toombs is dismissed from the University of Georgia. He will be reaccepted after writing a letter apologizing for the incident of the 15th.
  University of Georgia, Athens (UGA)
  Robert Toombs
March 18, 1830 Robert Toombs admitted to the bar in Elbert County.
  Elbert County, Georgia
  Robert Toombs
March 4, 1853 Robert Toombs begins his term as Senator of Georgia
  Robert Toombs
June 24, 1856 The Toombs Bill, an attempt to bring a constitutional convention to Kansas amid growing involvement of pro-slavery and abolitionist forces is introduced into the Congress.
  Robert Toombs
  Slavery in Georgia
January 7, 1861 Robert Toombs delivers a farewell to the U. S. Senate, almost two weeks before Georgia votes to secede.
  Robert Toombs
January 19, 1861 Georgia votes to secede from the Union at a convention held in Milledgeville, Georgia.
  Civil War - 1861
  Robert Toombs
  Milledgeville
  Slavery in Georgia
February 4, 1861 Georgia joins Florida, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, and South Carolina, becoming a member of the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States of America. Georgian Howell Cobb is named president of the assembly.
  Civil War - 1861
  Robert Toombs
  Howell Cobb
February 21, 1861 Robert Toombs selected Secretary of State, Confederate States of America
  Robert Toombs
July 19, 1861 Robert Toombs resigns his post as Secretary of State for the Confederate States of America
  Robert Toombs
July 21, 1861 Robert Toombs promoted to Brigadier General
  Robert Toombs
September 17, 1862 Battle of Sharpsburg (Antietam)
  Civil War - 1862
  Robert Toombs
  Philip Cook, CSA
March 4, 1863 Robert Toombs resigns his commission in the Confederate Army
  Robert Toombs
December 15, 1885 Robert Augustus Toombs dies, Washington, Georgia
  Wilkes County, Georgia
  Robert Toombs
August 18, 1905 Toombs County created
  Robert Toombs
  Creation of Georgia Counties
  Toombs County, Georgia


This rotund Georgia firebrand who was well-spoken and well-liked developed a flare for rhetoric early in his life. He attended the University of Georgia at Athens, but was dismissed, continuing his education at Union College, then studying law at the University of Virginia.

As early as 1850, serving in the House of Representatives, Toombs was a force with which to be reckoned, angrily attacking the Northern Cabal that was intent on destroying life in Toombs' beloved South. He was an outspoken supporter of the South's "right" to own slaves. Early in his career he remained pro-Union (supporting the Georgia Platform of 1850), only becoming an outspoken advocate of secession after exhausting all avenues of union, believing that Congress had no right to limit, restrain or impair slavery. Toombs was proven wrong on this assumption which lacked legal precedent.

Once he changed to a pro-secession stance, Toombs was at the forefront of Georgia's move to secede and joined the Jeff Davis administration as Secretary of State. He quickly realized that he had no say in the government and quit.

In the War Between the States, Robert Toombs is most noted for his defense of the Lower Bridge at Sharpsburg (Antietam). With significantly less than 1,000 men, Toombs and his Georgia's held off four divisions of Ambrose Burnside's IX Corps. A group of Union soldiers, finding a place to ford Antietam Creek, outflanked the unsuspecting Georgians. Under attack from two sides and outnumbered, the line crumbled and General Toombs was severely wounded.





Return to Index


FrontHistory 101Early GeorgiaAmerican IndiansSearch
WarsPeopleTimelineListsPlacesPoetry




Golden Ink
Georgia's innovative design group


Legal Notice
Privacy Policy
Copyright