Our Georgia History
 

Stone Mountain
June 9, 1790 Col. Marinus Willet meets Creek Indian Nation chiefs at the top of Stone Mountain. He takes them to New York to treat with President George Washington
  Stone Mountain
  George Washington
February 5, 1867 Stone Mountain Granite and Railway Company purchases Stone Mountain for $37,000
  Stone Mountain
May 26, 1914 In a letter to the editor, an Atlanta Constitution reader suggests carving a monument to the Confederacy at Stone Mountain
  Atlanta, Georgia (1900-2000)
  Stone Mountain
June 14, 1914 In the Atlanta Georgian, John Temple Graves, editor of the New York American, calls for the creation of a memorial to the men who fought for the Confederacy.
  Atlanta, Georgia (1900-2000)
  Stone Mountain
November 25, 1915 William Simmons, along with some of the men who lynched Leo Frank, and others burn a cross at the top of Stone Mountain, signaling the rebirth of the Ku Klux Klan
  Stone Mountain
  Ku Klux Klan in Georgia
  Leo Frank and the murder of Mary Phagan
May 20, 1916 Dedication of the official start of work on the carving at Stone Mountain
  Stone Mountain
  John Gutzon de la Mothe Borglum
June 23, 1923 Carving begins on Stone Mountain
  Stone Mountain
  John Gutzon de la Mothe Borglum
January 19, 1924 Gutzon Borglum unveils the head of Robert E. Lee at Stone Mountain, Georgia
  John Gutzon de la Mothe Borglum
  Stone Mountain
January 21, 1925 U. S. Mint strikes the first Stone Mountain coin.
  Stone Mountain
February 25, 1925 Committee overseeing the construction of Stone Mountain votes to cancel Gutzon Borglum's contract, following Borglum's outburst in the local papers over problems with the project.
  Stone Mountain
  John Gutzon de la Mothe Borglum
April 1, 1925 Sculptor Augustus Lukeman takes over the Stone Mountain project. He suggests that three men, Stonewall Jackson, Robert E. Lee and Jefferson Davis, be enshrined on the face of the mountain
  Stone Mountain
July 3, 1925 Stone Mountain coins go on sale at 3,000 banks across the Nation
  Stone Mountain
April 9, 1928 After blasting Gutzon Borglum's work from the face of Stone Mountain, Augustus Lukeman unveils his work on the face of the mountain. Mayor Jimmy Walker of New York attends the ceremony
  Stone Mountain
May 20, 1928 The Venables reclaim Stone Mountain, ending any attempt to complete the sculpture.
  Stone Mountain
March 27, 1941 The state creates the Stone Mountain State Park Authority
  Stone Mountain
April 11, 1956 The Venable family signs a quit claim deed for the area encompassing Stone Mountain, giving it to Stone Mountain Confederate Memorial, Inc.
  Stone Mountain
February 21, 1958 Gov. Marvin Griffin signs a bill creating the Stone Mountain Memorial Association, superceding the old Authority.
  Stone Mountain
September 19, 1958 Stone Mountain Confederate Memorial, Inc. gives Stone Mountain to the state of Georgia
  Stone Mountain
April 12, 1962 The Stone Mountain Scenic Railroad opens at Stone Mountain Park
  Stone Mountain
November 28, 1962 The Skylift, an Alpine-style tramway, opens at Stone Mountain Park. Governor Ernest Vandiver and Swiss Ambassador August Lindt attend the ceremony.
  Stone Mountain
April 16, 1963 The Antebellum Plantation opens at Georgia's Stone Mountain Park
  Stone Mountain
July 4, 1964 Carving resumes on the Stone Mountain Confederate Memorial
  Stone Mountain
April 2, 1970 A TV show titled "It Couldn't be Done" features the carving at Stone Mountain in a segment
  Stone Mountain
May 9, 1970 Dedication services are held for the carvings in Stone Mountain, although work continues on the masterpiece through 1972. President Nixon had been scheduled to attend, but Kent State forced him to give the visit to Vice-president Spiro Agnew.
  Stone Mountain
March 3, 1972 Stone Mountain carving is completed
  Stone Mountain


A granite monadnock once thought to be the largest piece of rock in the world, Stone Mountain was a landmark for Creek Indians and early settlers. By 1836 a small tourist industry developed and the town of New Gibraltar was founded west of the mountain in 1839. The name was changed to Stone Mountain in 1846.

Early industry capitalized on the granite, including a small quarrying industry sometime after 1850. The arrival of a spur line from the Georgia Railroad in 1869 launched a full-blown operation, although under a variety of companies.

The carving on the mountain was conceived in 1909 by Helen Plane, United Daughters of the Confederacy Atlanta chapter president. Designs varied, but at times included Robert E. Lee on a horse, Lee with 750 men riding behind him, Lee, Confederate President Jefferson Davis, General Stonewall Jackson, and an unidentified soldier and the final choice, Lee, Davis and Jackson.

Delayed until 1923, work began on the largest project of its kind under American artist Gutzon Borglum. This multifaceted artist was a little too much for the local folks to handle and he quit amid a good deal of controversy on both sides. According to one story, he crossed the border to South Carolina just ahead of the police.

Augustus Lukeman tried to create a new sculpture, but a limited timeframe ended his attempt. Borglum's work was blasted off the mountain and a new carving begun. After 3 years of work, the mountain was incomplete and the property reverted to the Venables.

As early as 1941 the state of Georgia expressed an interest in the carving, the mountain and surrounding land. In 1958 Georgia succeeded in purchasing the land from various heirs of the Venable estate and consolidating the purchase into today's Stone Mountain Park. Work began on finishing the carving in 1963.

Georgia, though, had additional plans for the property. They added the antebellum plantation, Confederate Hall and a Civil War Museum by the time the carving was complete in 1972.

More Information

Stone Mountain Park
Georgia's Stone Mountain

Carving Stone Mountain

Stone Mountain Park




Return to Index


FrontHistory 101Early GeorgiaAmerican IndiansSearch
WarsPeopleTimelineListsPlacesPoetry




Golden Ink
Georgia's innovative design group


Legal Notice
Privacy Policy
Copyright