Our Georgia History
 

Thomas Sumter
August 14, 1734 Thomas Sumter born, near Charlottesville, Virginia. Both Fort Sumter and Sumter County, Georgia are named in his honor
  Thomas Sumter
  Sumter County, Georgia
June 28, 1776 Before the signing of the Declaration of Independence, Lt. Colonel Thomas Sumter, under the command of William Moultrie, aided in the defense of Sullivan's Island and Fort Moultrie.
  Thomas Sumter
May 12, 1780 Benjamin Lincoln surrenders his command, Charleston, SC
  Andrew Pickens
  Benjamin Lincoln
  Thomas Sumter
  Lachlan McIntosh
October 6, 1780 Thomas Sumter promoted to Brigadier General by South Carolina Governor Edward Rutledge
  Thomas Sumter
November 20, 1780 Battle of Blackstock (or Blackstock's Farm)
  Thomas Sumter
June 1, 1832 Thomas Sumter died, near Stateburg, SC
  Thomas Sumter
  Sumter County, Georgia
April 12, 1861 Start of the American Civil War
  Thomas Sumter
  American Civil War


One of the greatest heroes of the American Revolution in the South, Thomas Sumter fought with courage after the loss of Charleston, SC, forming a brigade of militia in the backcountry while Gov. Rutledge removed to North Carolina. During this time, Sumter led his militia repeatedly against British Regulars in a guerilla war, rarely defeating them, yet effectively disrupting both lines of supply and lines of communication. It was during this time that Sumter earned his nickname, "The Gamecock."

Angered at the success of the irregulars and militia under Sumter's command, the British sent Banastre Tarleton, with an ample force, to chase The Gamecock. Realizing that the British commander had split his force to effectively chase the South Carolinians, and to give his men time to rest, Sumter decided to fortify a position and see if the British would attack. They did. Although the Americans suffered a serious blow to their high-level command, including Sumter and three colonels, the South Carolina militia won a stunning victory that laid the groundwork for the British defeat at Cowpens.

In December, 1810, after serving his country in various political positions, Sumter retired from public and continued to manage his plantation.





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